Ink-Dipped Advice: The Artist Statement

One of my favorite projects to work on with clients is the Artist Statement. I love learning about the passion that drives an artist to make particular choices, and to help that artist articulate the passion, vision, and work ethic to an audience.

While it’s most often visual artists such as painters and sculptors who use artist statements, they are useful for writers, dancers, musicians, filmmakers, fiber artists, actors, and basically any other art form.

Why? What possible use is an Artist Statement?

On a public level, it introduces you to a larger audience and provides context for your work. The Artist Statement is used in:

—Grant Proposals

—Residency Applications

—Web sites

—Media kits/rooms

—Introductions to your work that go deeper into context than the bio

Bios are important, too, and I’m an advocate of the three bio lengths: 50 words, 100 words, 250 words, to cover every occasion.

The Artist Statement runs between 150-250 words. You want enough to inform and tantalize, but don’t want to run on and bore. Even if you’ve had a thrilling career, attention spans are short.

The Artist Statement needs to include:

Your medium. Talk about what your form is and why you chose it.

The passion that drives your work. Why do you do this? Why not spend your time and energy on something safe? What drives you to create? That can include a couple of biographical sentences, provided they are relevant to your work.

Project specifics. This is a changeable paragraph. In some uses, you will need to talk about a project to which the statement/proposal/residency is geared. In other uses, you will give a sentence or two about a handful of your best/favorite projects and their context — the why and where of the creation.

Process. This is a short, succinct paragraph on HOW you do what you do. Avoid run-on sentences and navel-gazing. Use active language throughout the statement, but it is especially important here.

Avoid:

Passive voice

Overuse of adverbs

Ego-centric adjectives

Exclamation points (unless they are part of a work’s title)

Write your initial statement longer than you need, and cut. Cut, cut, cut. Tweak language and word choice. You want it to sparkle. You want it to have impact to engage and enchant, not to make the audience recoil (even the work itself is meant to disturb).

Read it out loud. Read it, record it, listen to it. Better yet, have someone else read it, so you can really hear it. You want a musicality to the flow. You want it to build, not be a set of disjointed paragraphs. You are sharing a piece of your soul.

Realize it is a living part of your body of work. Revisit your statement after any major project, and at least once a year. Make necessary changes. Update it in all the places you post it publicly. 

As your work grows, so will your Artist Statement — although it doesn’t get longer! You adjust it for different phases of your career.

Keep your old statements. Keep a file of your old statements and re-read them every few years. You will see the growth and change. You can also decide if you want to use any of the information for your Career Overview, which is a different type of piece.

Don’t be afraid to pour your passion into your drafts. Then use craft to hone the final draft. Ultimately, your Artist Statement melds your passion to your talent to your craft, and shares it with the world.

If you have any questions about the Artist Statement, leave it in the comments, and I will respond as soon as I can. If you want to contact me about help writing your statement, you can email me at contact – at – fearlessink – dot – com. My rates are reasonable.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *