Ink-Dipped Advice: Before the LOI

Recent conversations with fellow freelancers have included discussions on how to decide where to send one’s LOIs. Because I work in different arenas — the business equivalent of working across genre lines — I thought I’d share some of my experiences.

What Do I Want?

The flippant answer is, of course, the gig. But it’s more complicated than that.

It goes back to the work we did on our personal strategic plan. What do I want?

I want to tell stories that engage and enlarge audiences for business people and creatives who are passionate about their work. I want to help them spread the message.

That means I have to give a damn about what they do, and I have to trust their ethics. Plenty of writers don’t have to care, they sit down and write the gig. It’s about craft and communicating the client’s passion, and has little to do with their own. More power to them. My best work is when I also care about what I’m writing about — whether it’s forwarding a non-profit’s mission or extolling a client’s new product. I need to give a damn.

Ethics-wise, I have turned down high-paid gigs because I would be writing to promote something I believed was wrong. To accept the job, the money, and do the work, I would not be true to myself. Therefore, I am not the best person for the job, and refused the job.

If another writer chooses to write against what they believe in for the cash, that is their choice. I don’t live in their skins; they don’t live in mine. We have to make the decisions we need to make, for the various reasons we make them.

In addition, I want to be paid a fair price for the job. I want to be paid on time, as a professional in the field. This is my business, my livelihood, not my hobby. I have the right to enjoy my job. To say that people who love their jobs “don’t need” to be paid for them is ridiculous. So is saying writing isn’t a “real job.”

I want reasonable working hours and decent working conditions. I want to be treated with respect and dignity.

Who Needs My Skills & Do They Meet My Needs?

That’s where research comes in. I keep an eye out for companies and businesses that do interesting things. Sometimes it’s in the arts; sometimes it’s environmental/conservation/non-profit. Sometimes it’s a small business with a product or service. As I said, I do many different things. I’m interested in many different things.

Sometimes I meet someone at a networking event. Or I see a listing for a company and decide to do some research. If I like what I see, I write an LOI introducing myself, why I’m excited about the company, and where I think my skills might be a positive addition to their team.

I don’t bash what they’re doing or demean their current team. I’m there to help them, not get someone fired.

Research

I also dig a bit to find out what negative comments are made about the company, personnel, mission, or product. Then, I try to look at it in context. There are many reasons someone might have a bad experience. Is this something with evidence I can further research? Or a bad match and this is lashing out? It’s not always easy to find out; that’s where I trust my instincts.

I read a lot & try to keep up to date on who’s doing what where, who moves from position to position, how companies change their branding and business models. I also listen at networking events. Sometimes, a throwaway comment over a glass of wine and a crab puff can give you more information than a profile in a business mag.

Quite a bit of work goes into the LOI. It has to, or it’s not worth it for the recipient to respond. Well-researched, well-written introductions can set the stage for a positive partnership. Maybe it won’t be next week. Maybe it will be six months or a year down the line.

But long-term is as important as short-term. We could go into bad garden analogies here, but you get the idea.

How do you decide who to target? Or who not to target, when you create your LOIs?

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