Ink-Dipped Advice: Fred Needs a Writer: Chapter 6 — The Right Writer (and Graphic Designer) for the Job

Our story so far: Small business owner Fred needs a part-time marketing writer for his floor installation business. After advice from his friend, he put an ad on Craigslist and got a variety of responses. He asked for writing samples specific to his company; he received some, but his first choice of writer refused to do one for free. He interviewed several candidates. Each has strengths and weaknesses, and he’s not sure which one will be the right fit. He hires Brianna. At first, he’s happy, but lately, he feels like she’s not giving him the time and attention the job needs. At a Chamber of Commerce meeting, he runs into his first choice, and decides to meet and see how they’d work together.

Our final chapter: Fred discovers he’s nervous before his meeting with Jenny and Gretchen. He decides to stop at the bakery to get coffee and treats.

The meeting itself surprises him. After a few minutes, he forgets it’s a meeting. Jenny and Gretchen ask him questions about his business, about how it started and was passed down in the family. He finds himself telling anecdotes he’d long forgotten, and making notes to dig in the old albums for photographs.

He likes the way Jenny says, “There are several ways we could approach this” and then talks about the different ways. He likes that there are genuine differences.

“I like what I do,” he says. “I like my customers. Maybe it’s old-fashioned to like one’s customers, but I don’t think they’re stupid. I try to give them a floor that will look good, wear well, and help them live a good life. It’s not the most important job in the world, but then, most people don’t spend as much time thinking about floors all day as I do.”

He’s shocked that the women find this delightful. He’s shy when he brings out the ideas and the budget he put together. “It’s not much of a budget,” he admits, “but I’m not sure what things cost.”

“The point is to get the best results where you put your money,” says Jenny. “We can track the data, and interpret it, and see if it gets the results you want. If and when it doesn’t, we change direction. The most important thing is to capture your voice, your personality, your passion for your work, and spread it to the widest audience.”

They chart out an initial, six-month campaign that mixes articles, blog posts, direct mail, email blasts, and social media. They add a series of discount codes for new customers who come to them through one of the channels, so they can see who comes through which channel. They will buy a couple of ads in local publications. Jenny encourages Fred to set up another library talk (which she will promote), about sustainable floor materials. She knows of a library hosting a series of sustainability talks, and she thinks his would fit in nicely.

They make some adjustments in the budget, but it’s workable for Fred. Jenny and Gretchen’s fees are higher than anyone else he interviewed, but he likes their talent and enthusiasm.

The next day, Jenny forwards over a contract. This time, Fred reads it with care. It is what they discussed, although overnight he re-considered one or two points. They discuss the points, agree on a compromise, and sign. Fred sends a deposit. Fred tells Brianna he’s “changing direction.” He never even gets a response. At Jenny’s suggestion, he changes all his passwords.

Most of the work is done remotely, although Jenny is around to talk to the staff, pick up photographs, and she and Gretchen oversee a photo shoot with a professional photographer. Everything arrives on time, and it’s even better than Fred hoped.

“You’re paying those girls too much,” snorts Kurt. “And for what?”

“They’re professional women and delivering good quality work,” says Fred. “They’re worth it.”

Kurt mutters a few things about feminism, and Fred doesn’t pay attention. Maybe he should challenge Kurt, but it’s not worth the energy.

Jenny warned him that direct mail usually gets about a 3% rate. He is happily surprised when his gets a 7% rate. The showroom is hopping, and he has plenty to keep his staff busy. His social media response rate is about 4%, still above the average.

“We’ll learn and tweak,” Jenny promises.

Fred does another interview, this time with a regional newspaper. That generates even more business. An online publication responds to one of Jenny’s press releases, and that piece gets him more visibility. He’s asked to speak at the Elks Club, and then to present at a home sustainability conference. He’s even a featured speaker for the Chamber one month. Kurt makes fun of him, but Fred doesn’t care. The library invites him back for a panel discussion with all the sustainability speakers.

“I’m not much of a speaker,” Fred worries.

“You understand your topic, and you’re a good guy,” says Jenny. “That translates.”

He hires her to help him craft a few things she calls “talking points” and he calls “cue cards” that help keep him on track for the speeches.

Reporters start contacting him to ask him for quotes about topics on floors and sustainability. Fred starts reading more, and spending more time studying RENEWABLE ENERGY magazine and on the website for the American Council on Renewable Energy. He also talks about projects that can use flooring that’s ripped out of a site and repurposed into other objects.

The website is freshened, there’s regular interaction on social media (Jenny sends him a weekly report, summarizing any conversations she thinks he should know about; she also immediately forwards any information if someone mentions interest in the product).

Jenny encourages his desire to send clients holiday cards by mail. She suggests he segment his list between clients and prospects, with a different card and message on each type.

Fred is surprised. Clients are pleased to hear from him. Some of the prospects ask if they can set up appointments after the holidays.

“There will be times when things level off,” said Jenny. “Then we’ll come up with something fresh, and we’ll make some more gains.”

“Kurt said we’re bound to fail because people don’t need new floors very often,” said Fred. “He thinks I should install floors that will need replacing after a few years. But I don’t want to install low quality floors.”

“Stick to the quality of your product,” Jenny advises. “You’re becoming an expert source. People trust you.”

That’s the part Fred likes. He gets to meet new and interesting people, who like hearing about floors. His website and mail pieces reflect things he cares about. He can keep his workers employed steadily and even give them a raise. He can talk to Jenny and Gretchen honestly. They don’t make him feel old or out-of-touch. They can take some of his stodgier ideas and put a retro flair spin on them. He enjoys learning new things, and enjoys communicating

Fred and his business are both thriving because his message is successfully communicated to the right audience by the right people.

It’s worth the price.

It took him awhile, but he made the right choice.

What are your best freelance experiences, as the client, or the freelancer? I’d love to hear about them here.

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