Ink-Dipped Advice: Teaching Clients Tools

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I believe in teaching clients to be self-sufficient in certain areas.  I don’t believe that keeping clients dependent is good for business. I believe in working WITH clients, in making them feel more confident about how they present themselves and their business.  Sure, you can have long-term, ongoing relationships. 

But eventually, you outgrow each other, and that’s a good thing.

I often come into situations with clients where their previous marketing person/content writer has hoarded information and/or held it hostage. Often, this includes the social media accounts, apps, or networking tools.

I don’t believe that setting up social media accounts for my clients and running them for clients means I own those accounts. I don’t. They belong to the company. The content I create (once it’s paid for) belongs to the company — unless we have a special rights licensing in place. 

For instance, if I create fiction or radio for a client’s business (aka “Mission-Specific Entertainment”) it’s either a work for hire (in which case they pay me and keep all future rights) or I license them rights for certain usage and keep the copyright.

But refusing to share the log-in information for the client’s Instagram account with the actual client is, in my opinion, wrong.

I spend plenty of time setting up client accounts, and then figuring out how to schedule posts, cross post, etc. I am paid for that time. But I don’t own the accounts. The clients do.

If I pay for a scheduling platform, such as Buffer or Hootsuite or the like, and run everybody’s social media accounts off a platform for which I pay — yes, I’m paying for the platform, and a portion of that cost is factored into the social media package for which the client pays. But the client owns the actual social media account under their name. Should the client and I cease working together, I’d take them off the platform for which I pay, but they would still have their social media accounts.

If the responses have been directed back to me for response, when I leave a place, I make sure they have complete login, password, and the accounts are directed back to wherever they want/need it.

I don’t hold the accounts hostage.

What I prefer to do, even if I handle the regular posting, is to teach them how to post. I could get sick; I could leave. We could have a situation like we do now, where we have to work remotely and maybe not all their files are accessible to me, but are to other members of the company.

It’s good for them to know how to post on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram and Tumblr and any other platform on which they choose to frequent. It’s good for them to know how to set up a video conference or log into Slack.

The best way I’ve found to teach, whether it’s social media or a program or an app includes: 

Set Up Time Together It needs to be uninterrupted, where you can work side-by-side on the device to post. Or work via videoconference, and send over a step-by-step cheat sheet ahead of time. I’m big on cheat sheets anyway. People forget, unless they make a habit of using the tool.

Keep it Simple. Show them each step in setting up a post, but let THEM do it. Physically. Not just watch you do it. You do one. Then talk them through one. Have them do each step. More than once, if necessary, until they’re comfortable.

Simple Cheat Sheet. Write up a simple sheet with each step done as clearly and succinctly as possible. Too much information gets discouraging and distracting.

Praise the Learning. Be happy they’ve learned a new skill.

Keep Updated Logins and Passwords. I add new ones to my Master List and make up new Key Sheets once or twice a year for those who should have access, especially if the passwords have changed. People tend to remember the first password, and changes are lost in the mist.

It’s unlikely they’ll fire you to take it on themselves, but it’s good to have more than one person know how to handle these accounts.

When and how do you teach your clients skills?