Ink-Dipped Advice: Fred Needs A Writer Chapter 4: The Hire

 

Our story so far: Small business owner Fred needs a part-time marketing writer for his floor installation business. After advice from his friend, he put an ad on Craigslist and got a variety of responses. He asked for writing samples specific to his company; he received some, but his first choice of writer refused to do one for free. He interviewed several candidates. Each has strengths and weaknesses, and he’s not sure which one will be the right fit.

Fred decides to offer Walter the job.

“I’m interested in the job,” says Walter. “But now let’s talk money.”

Fred is puzzled. “I stated in the interview that the job was 10-15 hours a week, at minimum wage.”

“Sure you did,” says Walter. “That’s the starting point for the negotiation.”

“Negotiation?”

“You can’t expect a marketing professional to work for minimum wage,” says Walter. “That’s for manual labor or fast food or an internship. Professionals get professional rates.”

Fred thinks about the people Kurt and Sandra hire. They’re young, starting out.

“Also,” says Walter, “rather than charge by the hour, I prefer to work per project. What kind of projects are we talking?”

“Whatever comes up,” says Fred. “It changes.”

“I’ll leave you a rate sheet and you can call me when you want to get started.” Walter pulls a piece of paper out of his briefcase, hands it to Fred, and gets up, holding out his hand. “I look forward to working with you.”

Fred is confused. This isn’t at all the way they discussed working in the interview.

“He’s not the right choice,” says Margaret.

Fred decides to offer Mallory the job. She will bring some much-needed quiet to the office.

“Oh,” she says. “I didn’t think I’d hear from you. You know how it is; you go on a dozen interviews and never hear from anyone again.”

Fred didn’t know how it was.

“Anyway,” says Mallory, “I’ve accepted another job. It’s full-time, with benefits, and room for growth.”

“Congratulations,” says Fred.

“Don’t hire Cole,” warns Margaret. “You can’t rely on him.”

Fred leaves Cole a message that he didn’t get the job. After all, it’s only fair, especially after what Mallory told him.

That leaves him with Brianna. He’s not sure she’s right for the job, but maybe her fresh ideas will work. It’s either that, or start looking for more candidates and holding more interviews. The thought of it exhausts Fred.

“You can always just use the samples they wrote for you,” says Kurt. “That will buy you some time.”

Fred thinks that’s wrong (thanks to Jenny’s education), and decides to offer the job to Brianna.

Brianna accepts the job, although she manages to negotiate up to $20/hour. “It’s still lower than my regular rate,” she says. “But I can live with that, for now. This is only part-time, and I’ll have to make it up on my other gigs.”

Penny only gets $15 an hour, even though she’s worked for Fred for several years. He feels like he can’t give Brianna $20/hour without giving Penny the same.

“Don’t be stupid,” says Kurt. “It’s not their business, what each other are paid. Don’t say anything.”

Fred doesn’t feel right about it. Penny is thrilled to get a $5/hour raise.

“You did the right thing,” says Margaret. “But let’s hope Brianna’s good enough to get us enough new business to cover the increased expense.”

Brianna gives him a contract. He glances at it, mostly to make sure the hours and the rate are correct, and signs it.

The first month goes well. Brianna shows up on time, has a positive attitude. She talks to everybody, shadows the other employees, takes lots of photos. She goes to several sites, gets the proper permissions from the homeowners, and takes and posts photos of the work on the website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumbler. She freshens up some of the content on the website, and changes the wording so it’s more fun.

She designs a Facebook ad for a limited-time sale rate, and they do something called “boosting” it. It doesn’t cost very much, only about 100 dollars. According to the data Brianna shows him, it reached 3,197 people. They got 21 calls from it, and 7 walk-ins. It looks like a little more than half of them will actually become customers.

“You need to attend more chamber events and more business events,” she suggests. “Unless you want to pay me to attend.”

“You should do a podcast,” she suggests. “Or a blog.”

That sounds interesting to Fred, until she gives him the cost sheet. “You hired me for social media,” she says. “Look at the contract. Anything that’s not a social media post is an additional charge.”

That includes press releases, which worries Fred. He expected press releases included in the hourly rate. He’s annoyed that he didn’t read the contract more closely in the first place. When he re-reads it, he sees Brianna is correct. It’s all clearly spelled out. Very different terms than they discussed, but this is what he signed.

But Brianna knows a local reporter and convinces him to come and do a story for the paper. Brianna takes the pictures. It looks nice. Fred frames a copy and hangs it up in the store. Brianna buys several copies of the paper (on Fred’s dime). She scans one copy of the article, and makes physical photocopies. She puts them in something she calls a “clip file” and keeps one copy for her own portfolio.

They get more phone calls, and even more walk-ins, although fewer of these walk-ins seem like they’ll actually buy anything. The article just made them curious. But that’s okay. Maybe a year or so down the road, they’ll need a new floor, and they’ll call him.

But then, Brianna starts changing her hours. Fred never knows when she will come in. At first, she calls, and asks for more flexibility, due to her other jobs. But then, she stops calling, and comes in and out at random times, but just for an hour or two. Social media posts still go up regularly. Brianna still bills him for the same amount of hours, saying she’s working remotely.

Sometimes, she shows up when Penny is there. Since they are supposed to share a desk and computer, it means Brianna perches on a stool in the showroom, working from her iPad.

The number of new customers has fallen off. Fred wants to sit down with Brianna to plan out a long-term campaign. He’s proud of himself for even setting up a budget, albeit a small one.

But Brianna never seems to have the time.

When Fred tries to bring this up, Brianna says, “Look, you’re my lowest paying client. I can’t afford to work for you if I have to give you priority over my higher-paying clients.”

“All I’m asking for is the time for which you contracted.” He points to the contract.

“It says 10-15 hours,” Brianna replies. “It doesn’t say when they have to happen.”

Fred isn’t sure what to do. What advice would you give Fred?

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