Ink-Dipped Advice: Your Refusal to Network Hurts Your Business

 

This post is relevant to clients and to freelancers.

One of the things I do when I sit down with clients who want me to create marketing materials is to discuss how they network. It’s something that also comes up at meet-ups with freelancers, conferences, and other events. This helps me create the best possible marketing materials for the company. As a freelancer, networking helps me meet potential clients who need my skills; or, if I’m not the right person for their needs, I can usually refer another freelancer I know.

I’m always astonished when I get this answer from BOTH clients and other freelancers: “I don’t have time to network.”

Say what?

How do you expect anyone to find you/hire you/buy your product?

Putting up a website is NOT enough.

One of the best ways to network, whether you’re a business trying to expand your profile or a freelancer looking for new clients, is your local Chamber of Commerce.

The point of local chambers is to connect businesses with each other, so they can work together and grow the community’s economy.

Businesses, you’ll find potential markets and people with skills you need to grow your business.

Freelancers, there’s a pool of people who need your skills. And remember – as a freelancer, you ARE a small business.

Most chambers have one or more open houses during the course of a year. They’re worth checking out. Many chambers will also allow newcomers to attend one or two meetings in the course of a season before paying the fee.

Other networking opportunities include Meet-Ups, associations, non-profit events, and conferences in your town. Any community-based event can be the chance to network.

Having said that, it’s important to be appropriate in the situation. If you attend the Community Holiday Carol singalong, don’t just run up to people and hand out your card. Share the music, share the song sheets, chat with people over cider and cookies. Match your approach to the event or you’ll drive people away instead of engage them.

When I’m discussing marketing strategies with potential clients, I often hear, “Oh, I joined the Chamber for a year and it wasn’t worth the money.”

My response is, “I’m sorry to hear that. Which events did you attend?”

The response, 99.9% of the time is, “Oh, I didn’t GO to any events.”

Do you see the disconnect?

In order to engage a larger audience, you must ENGAGE. Sitting at home, paying a fee to the Chamber (or any other organization) and expecting them to chase after you is unrealistic.

Join an organization. ATTEND EVENTS. Get to know your fellow attendees. LISTEN more than you TALK.

That will give you an idea who to approach for an appointment – or even for a coffee to get to know each other better.

Walking up to a stranger, handing out a card, and demanding someone hire you will NOT get you hired. However, having a conversation, getting to know the background, the business, and asking questions to find out more and to find out their goals and dreams for the coming year – that gives you something upon which to build.

Sitting home in your pajamas won’t grow your business. Sitting in on an event, listening, learning, and then responding appropriately sets a good foundation.

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